Tag Archives: school

New Podcast Episode – Heart Murmurs

Hey everyone!

Please go check out the latest Medical Minded podcast episode Heart Murmurs – MS, MR, MVP, AS and AR. This podcast is an expansion on the concepts presented in the Introduction to Heart Sounds episode, so make sure if checked it out if you haven’t already. In this latest episodes I discuss mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation, mitral valve prolapse, aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation. If you plan on only learning the basics of heart murmurs, these are the 5 you need to know!

Also, if there is one thing that I can’t reiterate enough about learning this stuff it’s to develop an understanding of the underlying concepts. If you learn the basic principles, the heart sounds will make sense. You should be able to work out why each sound happens if you truly understand the material. Remember, you need a solid foundation to build a house!

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Patient History Cheat Sheet!

Here’s a “cheat sheet” that I came up with during 1st year for taking a full patient history. I figure it may be helpful for any premeds or 1st years out there. There are some fun rhymes and mnemonics for remembering everything. It’s not something I expect everyone to find useful, but hopefully it helps some of you out!

HPI Cheat Sheet

Ten weird and terrifying medical instruments from the past

Check out the article Ten weird and terrifying medical instruments from the past to see some interesting items from medical history. I love stuff like this!

Childbirth vs Getting Kicked in the Balls

This video is awesome! Great explanation of the reason we experience pain, as well as the associated symptoms of childbirth and taking a shot to the groin. I’m by no means promoting that one is worse than the other. In fact, I gladly would give women the upper hand and say childbirth wins based on the duration alone. Regardless of your opinion, this is a pretty great video!

 

Poor Sleep Means More Than Feeling Tired – Association with Brain Atrophy

A new study published on September 3 in Neurology and reported on Medscape shows that poor sleep quality may actually lead to brain atrophy. Using 147 people ranging from 20 to 84 years in age, researchers submitted participants to MRI scanning over several years. Sleep quality was measured by a self-administered exam. Additional testing parameters included physical activity, BMI and blood pressure. The results were as follows:

  • 35% of participants met the criteria for “poor sleep”.
  • Poor sleep quality correlated to decreased brain volume in an area located within the right superior frontal cortex
    • Correlated to shorter sleep duration, lower efficiency, and increased latency
  • Poor sleep was associated with atrophy of the frontal, temporal and parietalcortices.
    • Such traits are linked with reduced memory and cognitive functioning
  • More significant in older adults, but association present in participants under 60 years of age as well
  • Differences in physical activity, BMI and blood pressure could not account for any of the changes

Further research will need to determine whether poor sleep is the cause of brain atrophy or a result of brain atrophy. However, such research could also shed light onto various diseases of cognitive decline.

Book Review: Discover Magazine’s Vital Signs

Discover Magazine’s Vital Signs: True Tales of Medical Mysteries, Obscure Diseases, and Life-Saving Diagnoses by Dr. Rob Norman

If you’re a fun of short medical stories, this is a simple and interesting read. Some stories are definitely more exciting than others, but medicine is a broad subject, filled with a variety of specialties. What one person finds fascinating, another feels completely uninterested. This book features stories published in a Discover Magazine column known as “Vital Signs”. The writers are physicians of varying specialties and bring excitement to the arena of numerous specialties. One important factor that I took from the book is confirmation of the importance of the patient history. Several life-saving diagnoses are made based on a single fact presented by the patient. The best part about this book is the format being numerous short stories. If you don’t have the time to read a large novel, check this book out to get your reading fix fulfilled.

Webinar: Getting Into Med School With Low Stats

The website Accepted.com is a great resource for anyone looking to get into a graduate program. As you can see from the medicalminded.com home page, I was featured on their “Accepted Admissions Blog”. They are hosting a greater webinar opportunity for medical school applicants, so be sure to check it out!

 

Can You Get into Med School with Low Stats?

You are invited to attend Accepted.com’s upcoming webinar, How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats, a MUST-ATTEND event if you’re applying to med school with low GPA/MCAT scores!

Date: Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Time: 5:00 PM PT/8:00 PM ET

Register now to learn important strategies that will help you get into med school, even with low test scores or grades.

Don’t let you your low stats keep you from pursuing your medical dreams!

7 Factors to Improve Blood Pressure Readings

A recent AMA Wire article discussed seven ways to improve blood pressure readings. Although the factors may seem arbitrary at first glance, they have been shown to significantly impact results.

Check out the article through the link above or at least give the following image a quick glance.

Common Problems to Elevated BP

Choosing A Specialty – Brilliant Insight!

Today I heard some of the most insightful information throughout my time in medical school. This insight was told to my class by the dean of education in regards to selecting a specialty. Although we won’t be required to do so until the end of 3rd year, it was still a very encouraging concept. Obviously I am paraphrasing, but the general concept went as follows:

Don’t eliminate pursuing a certain specialty based on the idea that it won’t fit the type of lifestyle you want. You can modify your career  to conform to whatever lifestyle you want to live. You can choose to work part-time, full-time, etc. No matter what, there will be times when your career as a physician interferes with your life outside of healthcare. The important thing is that you’re missing those outside moments of life to do something you love. If you miss out on things like family for a career you don’t have a passion for, you’re going to be miserable. Choose to pursue a specialty because you love it.

It seems that many physicians today have a propensity to focus their attention on the negative aspects of medicine. More often than not, people don’t like change, and medicine is a rapidly changing field. There will undoubtedly be both good and bad outcomes as a result of these changes. However, it is very encouraging as a medical student to hear someone discuss the ability to maintain a well-rounded lifestyle in medicine. Being a person who is family-focused in every choice that I make, this is especially meaningful to me. My wife and I have always known there will be times when I can’t be there for family events or activities. However, I also know that I want to be there as often as possible. If it came to choosing between my family and my career, it’d be my family every time. No questions asked. However, hearing an MD say that raising a family will not and should not restrict me from choosing a specialty I develop a passion for is extremely encouraging.

Neuroanatomy Complete!

I officially completed neuroanatomy as of yesterday when I took the NBME Shelf Exam. What is NBME? The National Board of Medical Examiners is an organization that provides assessments of healthcare professionals. After each completed course in medical school, we take an NBME Shelf Exam that serves as a cumulative assessment of the material we should have learned. Unfortunately for any campus on block scheduling such as myself, most exams implement material from other courses as well (some of which we haven’t even taken yet!), but you just have to suffer through those questions and focus on what you know. But I digress… 

Neuroanatomy was definitely a challenging course since I wasn’t familiar with most of the material. However, it was also one of my favorite courses thus far. The complexities of the nervous system are absolutely fascinating, and what’s even more amazing is how much is still unknown. The brain is a truly amazing machine. The course seemed to be the most clinically applicable of everything I’ve had thus far, which made me much more dedicated towards learning the material. Although there is so much more to learn, I can tell that my ability to actually diagnose various conditions is continually developing. Even prior to taking neuroanatomy I had considered neurology a field of interest, and I could still see it as a possibility in my future. That being said, Emergency Medicine always seems to be calling my name. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to explore that field until my fourth year of school. However, I intend to keep an open mind about all fields until I’ve had a chance to experience them. As for now, it’s on to physiology! 

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