Tag Archives: premedical

Sarcomere Components

I remember when I used to get all the different parts of the sarcomere mixed up, but with a few simple tricks you can remember it easy and long-term.

First, understand the the I band is isotropic and the A band is anisotropic. Although these terms technically refer to the behavior of polarized light passing through, I like to think of isotropic = moving and anisotropic = non-moving (remember that “an-“ means “without”).

So how do you remember which is the thick filament and which is the thin filament? Just remember that the heavier something is, the less likely it’ll move! In other words, think of the thick filaments as too heavy to move which means they’re the A bands because “an-“ (or “a” if that’s easier for you) means “without”. By default, the thin filament will be the I band. Additionally, the letter “I” is thinner than the letter “A” so it’s gotta be the “thin” filament right?

Now Z lines are you endpoints which should be easy to remember, because the letter “Z” is at the end of the alphabet. This actually ties into the next point too.

The points that “move” during muscle contraction are the H band and I band which spell “HI”. In other words, the “HI” bands bring the ends of the sarcomere (Z lines) closer together so they can say “Hi”!

Obviously this doesn’t cover everything you should know about the sarcomere and muscle contraction, but hopefully it helps get you started if you were having trouble!

 

Sarcomere

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Webinar: Getting Into Med School With Low Stats

The website Accepted.com is a great resource for anyone looking to get into a graduate program. As you can see from the medicalminded.com home page, I was featured on their “Accepted Admissions Blog”. They are hosting a greater webinar opportunity for medical school applicants, so be sure to check it out!

 

Can You Get into Med School with Low Stats?

You are invited to attend Accepted.com’s upcoming webinar, How to Get into Medical School with Low Stats, a MUST-ATTEND event if you’re applying to med school with low GPA/MCAT scores!

Date: Wednesday, July 30, 2014
Time: 5:00 PM PT/8:00 PM ET

Register now to learn important strategies that will help you get into med school, even with low test scores or grades.

Don’t let you your low stats keep you from pursuing your medical dreams!

Medical Minded Podcast

The Medical Minded Podcast is official!

MedMinded Logo

I encourage everyone to visit here or go to the iTunes store and a quick search should should allow you to find it. The iTunes artwork isn’t currently working, but I’ve made adjustments so hopefully it gets updated in the next few days.

The current “test” podcast is over the pathogenic Bacillus species of bacteria and I intend to continue making more educational-based podcasts. However, if anyone has suggestions for subject matter they’d like to be covered just let me know! I’d really like some input!

This applies to premeds, med students or anyone else! It can be over educational material, writing essays, application processes, research or anything else you can think of. Hopefully I’ll know the answer and if not, I will do my best to come up with an answer!

To summarize in a few words:

Comments, suggestions, and questions are highly welcomed and encouraged!

 

Excellent Resource – CDC Public Health Image Library (PHIL)

I recently stumbled upon the CDC Public Health Image Library (PHIL) and thought it would be an excellent resource to share with others. I’ll be adding it to the growing list of recommended websites for this blog as well.

Basically, you can use keywords to search through their image database and you’ll find a lot of pictures related to your criteria. It’s a very useful resource for anyone completing a presentation, research, etc. It’s also really nice to just look through images of stuff you’re learning about. For example, we covered tuberculosis today and a quick search yields pages and pages of pictures of cultures, X-rays, slides, lesions etc. It could be especially beneficial for any visual learners out there! Give it a try!

If You’re Involved With Medicine, Go Here!! – Meducation.net

meducation

I’m always on the lookout for medical resources. Honestly, it’s somewhat of an obsession. I love figuring out the most effective means of learn something, developing streamlined processes, etc. One of the reasons I maintain this blog is to help education others, generally premedical students and/or medical students. I recommend that any and all premed/medical students should visit www.meducation.net and create an account. Do it… seriously…. right now.

I haven’t got the chance to explore this site very much yet, but the potential is what catches my attention immediately. From what I can gather, it’s a UK-based e-learning startup company. It immediately reminds me of a Pinterest for medical professionals. You can create boards and add different medical materials to them. Materials are regularly added by other members of the website and some of them are very well-done and extremely beneficial to medical education. You can also add you own materials so that others can use them to continue their own education.

Instead of me going into the details of the site, just do yourself a favor and go sign up!

Ocular Loiasis – Loa Loa

Ocular Loiasis - Loa Loa

I figured I’d post this in honor of my upcoming microbiology exam here in a few hours. The case can be reviewed here: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMicm1002020

The link also contains a video of the parasitic worm moving in the eye. Enjoy!

Enemas For Everyone!

There’s an email chain letter going around that I found interesting with a nice dose of humor. Basically, the email asks you to guess what the following image is:

A hint is that it was used by physicians!

 

Answer

The instrument in question is a tobacco smoke enema device used to well… blow smoke up people’s butts! It was thought that doing so could treat gastrointestinal discomfort and was even used in attempts to resuscitate victims of near drowning. Fortunately, people eventually realized that the nicotine actually poisoned patients. For more information, visit this link!

Choosing A Specialty – Brilliant Insight!

Today I heard some of the most insightful information throughout my time in medical school. This insight was told to my class by the dean of education in regards to selecting a specialty. Although we won’t be required to do so until the end of 3rd year, it was still a very encouraging concept. Obviously I am paraphrasing, but the general concept went as follows:

Don’t eliminate pursuing a certain specialty based on the idea that it won’t fit the type of lifestyle you want. You can modify your career  to conform to whatever lifestyle you want to live. You can choose to work part-time, full-time, etc. No matter what, there will be times when your career as a physician interferes with your life outside of healthcare. The important thing is that you’re missing those outside moments of life to do something you love. If you miss out on things like family for a career you don’t have a passion for, you’re going to be miserable. Choose to pursue a specialty because you love it.

It seems that many physicians today have a propensity to focus their attention on the negative aspects of medicine. More often than not, people don’t like change, and medicine is a rapidly changing field. There will undoubtedly be both good and bad outcomes as a result of these changes. However, it is very encouraging as a medical student to hear someone discuss the ability to maintain a well-rounded lifestyle in medicine. Being a person who is family-focused in every choice that I make, this is especially meaningful to me. My wife and I have always known there will be times when I can’t be there for family events or activities. However, I also know that I want to be there as often as possible. If it came to choosing between my family and my career, it’d be my family every time. No questions asked. However, hearing an MD say that raising a family will not and should not restrict me from choosing a specialty I develop a passion for is extremely encouraging.

Medical School Education

People often ask what medical school is like, so I made this fun cartoon as a response. Basically, trying to learn everything they throw at you in medical school is like drinking from a fire hose. Enjoy!

Neuroanatomy Complete!

I officially completed neuroanatomy as of yesterday when I took the NBME Shelf Exam. What is NBME? The National Board of Medical Examiners is an organization that provides assessments of healthcare professionals. After each completed course in medical school, we take an NBME Shelf Exam that serves as a cumulative assessment of the material we should have learned. Unfortunately for any campus on block scheduling such as myself, most exams implement material from other courses as well (some of which we haven’t even taken yet!), but you just have to suffer through those questions and focus on what you know. But I digress… 

Neuroanatomy was definitely a challenging course since I wasn’t familiar with most of the material. However, it was also one of my favorite courses thus far. The complexities of the nervous system are absolutely fascinating, and what’s even more amazing is how much is still unknown. The brain is a truly amazing machine. The course seemed to be the most clinically applicable of everything I’ve had thus far, which made me much more dedicated towards learning the material. Although there is so much more to learn, I can tell that my ability to actually diagnose various conditions is continually developing. Even prior to taking neuroanatomy I had considered neurology a field of interest, and I could still see it as a possibility in my future. That being said, Emergency Medicine always seems to be calling my name. Unfortunately, I won’t be able to explore that field until my fourth year of school. However, I intend to keep an open mind about all fields until I’ve had a chance to experience them. As for now, it’s on to physiology! 

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