Tag Archives: med

Shoes for Clinical Duties – Particularly for the Gents

I know this may seem trivial, silly, unimportant or any of a million other descriptive terms you may come up with, but for people like myself, a quality pair of shoes makes the difference between a day of misery and a day of success. Many people decide to just wear tennis shoes, but I wanted to have a shoe that was suitable for wearing with my business casual attire and scrubs without so I wouldn’t need to worry about transporting multiple pairs. Another important feature was the ease with which they could be cleaned since you never know what is going to end up on your footwear in healthcare. Take one look around any facility and I guarantee you’ll see Dansko shoes worn by someone. While these may be fine for some people, I couldn’t bring myself to wearing them. No offense to any guys reading this with a pair in their closet, but those look like girl shoes. Thus, my search began and eventually ended in success!

Gentleman, if you need a pair of shoes for clinical duties, look no further. I researched several pairs of shoes and ultimately decided on Merrel as the brand to test out. Without a doubt, one of the most comfortable pair of shoes I’ve owned and one that meets all of the aforementioned criteria are the Encore Gust Slip-On Shoes available through Amazon.

 

They are extremely comfortable, very easy to clean, durable and at $100, they’re actually cheaper than most Dansko shoes anyway. I can’t comment on the other similar pairs sold by Merrell, but I imagine there are other great choices as well. I know the “EVA footbed” of the pair I purchased is a big reason for the comfort, so you might want to be sure you purchase a pair with this feature as well. Anyways, if you’re in the market for some quality shoes, I highly suggest you give these a shot!

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Heart Embryology – YouTube Video

It may be “old school”, but this is still probably one of the best embryology videos out there. Watch it with your notes, textbook or review book in hand as an additional guide and it definitely makes things much clearer. Always worth going back for review if you’ve seen it before too!

What is a superantigen and how do they work?

See this video for an excellent explanation of superantigens and the sequence of events they induce. A prototypical example of a superantigen is toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) released by S. aureus.

In a nutshell:
1) Superantigen binds periphery of T-cell and MHC molecule receptors
2) Non-selective T-cell activation with release of IFN-gamma
3) Macrophage activation and release of IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-alpha
4) Non-specific inflammatory response

Rubeola vs Rubella vs Roseola

I’m definitely someone who struggles keeping stuff organized when things sound the same, so I was always getting these mixed up. Here is a helpful cartoon courtesy of Jorge Muniz on www.medcomic.com to help keep things straight. The website actually has a lot of great cartoons that can really help you learn in a fun way. Enjoy!

New Podcast Episode – Heart Murmurs

Hey everyone!

Please go check out the latest Medical Minded podcast episode Heart Murmurs – MS, MR, MVP, AS and AR. This podcast is an expansion on the concepts presented in the Introduction to Heart Sounds episode, so make sure if checked it out if you haven’t already. In this latest episodes I discuss mitral stenosis, mitral regurgitation, mitral valve prolapse, aortic stenosis and aortic regurgitation. If you plan on only learning the basics of heart murmurs, these are the 5 you need to know!

Also, if there is one thing that I can’t reiterate enough about learning this stuff it’s to develop an understanding of the underlying concepts. If you learn the basic principles, the heart sounds will make sense. You should be able to work out why each sound happens if you truly understand the material. Remember, you need a solid foundation to build a house!

New Podcast Episode – Introduction to Heart Sounds

Check out the latest episode of the Medical Minded Podcast that provides an introduction to heart sounds!

Medical Minded Logo

Also, please leave a review and/or submit any suggestions for future episodes. Thanks!

Patient History Cheat Sheet!

Here’s a “cheat sheet” that I came up with during 1st year for taking a full patient history. I figure it may be helpful for any premeds or 1st years out there. There are some fun rhymes and mnemonics for remembering everything. It’s not something I expect everyone to find useful, but hopefully it helps some of you out!

HPI Cheat Sheet

Stop Highlighting That Textbook!

Have you ever read through your textbook, highlighted “important” information, and then reviewed your highlights to study for an exam?

Stop!!

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Some studies show as many as 80% of students use this method as their primary mode of studying and it also happens to be one of the most ineffective ways to study!

For a while now I’ve had an interest in memory techniques and the efficiency of learning. Lately, I’ve become somewhat obsessed! If I were to recommend one book to everyone, it would be Make it Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Peter C. Brown, Henry L. Roediger III, and Mark A McDaniel. The book has some phenomenal information regarding learning and is helpful to people of all ages. It was the source of the introductory information regarding highlighting as well. Apparently, highlighting is not only time-consuming and ineffective, it also creates a false sense of knowing the material since you familiarize yourself with the words. Instead, you should force yourself to recall the information without reading it again (flashcards, creating outlines from memory, etc.). Obviously, you can’t always remember everything and will need to go back to review certain material. However, the stuff you do remember will “stick” better if more effort is required to recall it. This is just the tip of the iceberg in regards to helpful information in the above book, so like I said, you should definitely check it out.

Most of the books I’ve been reading lately deal with the science behind effective learning, speed reading, memory palaces, mnemonics, etc. and I honestly can’t get enough. In the coming weeks I should definitely have some update recommendations. I’m currently even enrolled in an online course that teaches speed reading, and I have high hopes for it. I generally read at about 300 WPM with 80% retention and have a goal of 500 WPM within the next couple months while keeping retention at 80-90%. I’ll be sure to keep everyone updated and recommend the course if it works out!

However, it’s the last few weeks of the semester for medical school as well, so hopefully I’ll be able to keep up with everything!

Ten weird and terrifying medical instruments from the past

Check out the article Ten weird and terrifying medical instruments from the past to see some interesting items from medical history. I love stuff like this!

Childbirth vs Getting Kicked in the Balls

This video is awesome! Great explanation of the reason we experience pain, as well as the associated symptoms of childbirth and taking a shot to the groin. I’m by no means promoting that one is worse than the other. In fact, I gladly would give women the upper hand and say childbirth wins based on the duration alone. Regardless of your opinion, this is a pretty great video!

 

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