Tag Archives: health

Making Step 1 Studying Fun!

In an effort to keep my sanity and have some fun studying for Step 1, I decided to create a short animation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. It’s obviously not anything special and by no means comprehensive, but I just got the software and haven’t done anything like this before, so give me a break! haha Hopefully I’ll have some time to actually get relatively decent using the software after my exam, so I can create some quality videos, gifs, etc. related to medicine. Enjoy!

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Make A Difference in Nepal!

Hey everyone! A friend of mine was in Nepal when the earthquake happened and fortunately she is alright. Amazingly, she’s taking this opportunity to help those who were victims of the earthquake. I know most of my followers are students without much money, BUT if you can find it in your heart to donate to a charity that benefits a victim of the Nepal earthquake that would be wonderful! Check out her story.

 

This is definitely a charity where you can KNOW where your money is going and that it will be put to great use, so please help out if you can!

Iron-Deficiency Anemia – Homeostasis Image

A short article regarding iron deficiency anemia was recently published on the New England Journal of Medicine blog. The thing that immediately caught my attention was this beautiful image of iron homeostasis. Iron deficiency anemia is the most common anemia worldwide so it’s definitely something to be familar with. See the article here.

Great Video Against Body Shaming!

A great video that everyone should watch. People are made in all shapes and sizes! Obviously healthcare professionals should encourage a healthy lifestyle, I think many people fail to realize that a healthy lifestyle does not mean a runway model body.

Be fit. Be healthy. Be proud of who you are.

Sarcomere Components

I remember when I used to get all the different parts of the sarcomere mixed up, but with a few simple tricks you can remember it easy and long-term.

First, understand the the I band is isotropic and the A band is anisotropic. Although these terms technically refer to the behavior of polarized light passing through, I like to think of isotropic = moving and anisotropic = non-moving (remember that “an-“ means “without”).

So how do you remember which is the thick filament and which is the thin filament? Just remember that the heavier something is, the less likely it’ll move! In other words, think of the thick filaments as too heavy to move which means they’re the A bands because “an-“ (or “a” if that’s easier for you) means “without”. By default, the thin filament will be the I band. Additionally, the letter “I” is thinner than the letter “A” so it’s gotta be the “thin” filament right?

Now Z lines are you endpoints which should be easy to remember, because the letter “Z” is at the end of the alphabet. This actually ties into the next point too.

The points that “move” during muscle contraction are the H band and I band which spell “HI”. In other words, the “HI” bands bring the ends of the sarcomere (Z lines) closer together so they can say “Hi”!

Obviously this doesn’t cover everything you should know about the sarcomere and muscle contraction, but hopefully it helps get you started if you were having trouble!

 

Sarcomere

Crohn’s Disease Infographic

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New Podcast Episode – Gram Staining: Gram-Negative vs Gram-Positive Bacteria

Check out the latestMedical Minded Podcast episode, Gram Staining: Gram-Negative vs Gram-Positive Bacteria which covers what gram staining is, how it works and how it is used to differentiate gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. This is a must know for anything who is a med student, premed or even just taking a biology course. I know this episode may be basic for some people, but it’s essential information and it’s always good to work on the fundamentals!

Top Non-Work Activities Physicians Enjoy

Results from a survey conducted by AMA Insurance have been released to show the most popular non-work activities that physicians enjoy. A quick glance at the image shows the most popular hobbies, but more can be seen in the article found here.

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Probably the Oddest Study You’ll See Today – Hugs Prevent Infections!

In a recent study, researchers found a correlation between hugs and rates of infection with the common cold… who knew?!

Patient History Cheat Sheet!

Here’s a “cheat sheet” that I came up with during 1st year for taking a full patient history. I figure it may be helpful for any premeds or 1st years out there. There are some fun rhymes and mnemonics for remembering everything. It’s not something I expect everyone to find useful, but hopefully it helps some of you out!

HPI Cheat Sheet

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